• Users Online: 97
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 693-700

Assessment of knowledge and practice of disease surveillance and notification among health workers in private hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria


1 Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, Enugu State University; Department of Community Medicine, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Nigeria
3 Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla; Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ifeoma Juliet Ogugua
Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku/Ozalla, Enugu
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/NJM.NJM_132_21

Rights and Permissions

Background: Disease surveillance and notification (DSN) has been recognized as an effective strategy for prevention and control of diseases, particularly epidemic-prone diseases. Aim: This study assessed the knowledge and practice of DSN activities in private health facilities (PHFs) in Enugu metropolis. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, utilizing mixed methods. Multistage sampling method was used to select the PHFs and the respondents. Respondents were health-care workers (HCWs) in charge of DSN in PHFs within Enugu metropolis and the state epidemiologist. Chi-square test and multivariate analysis using binary logistic regression were used for analysis. Results: Being a medical doctor (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 6.567; confidence interval [CI]: 1.250–34.502) was found to be a predictor of good knowledge. Facilities having more than ten patients daily (AOR: 0.012; CI: 0.085–0.739) and poor knowledge of Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) system (AOR: 0.135; CI: 0.028–0.660) were predictors of poor IDSR practice. Four major themes emerged from the key informant interview: the level of involvement of state with DSN in PHFs, support available to PHFs, challenges in assessing DSN data in PHFs, and measures to improve DSN activities in PHFs. Conclusion: The HCWs in charge of DSN had good knowledge of IDSR system, but the practice was poor. There is a need for regular training with supportive supervision of the HCWs to ensure they translate knowledge into practice.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed524    
    Printed20    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded40    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal