Nigerian Journal of Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 658--664

Determinants of risky sexual behavior among secondary school adolescents in cross River State, Nigeria


Lilian Eberechukwu Eyam1, Sunday Eyam Eyam2, Bernadine Nsa Ekpeyong3, Antor Odu Ndep3, Margaret Inemesit Akpan3, Emanuel Ekanem Ekanem4 
1 Department of General Studies, College of Health Technology, University of Calabar, Calabar, CRS, Nigeria
2 Department of Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, CRS, Nigeria
3 Department of Public Health, Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, CRS, Nigeria
4 Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Sunday Eyam Eyam
Department of Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, PMB 1115, Calabar, CRS
Nigeria

Background: Adolescent risky sexual behavior and its consequences are serious problems affecting all the nations negatively and require research attention to profer solutions. Aim: To determine the prevalence of risky sexual behavior and its determinants among adolescents in co-educational secondary schools in Cross River State (CRS). Materials and Methods: The study design was cross sectional and involved the use of semi-structured self-administered questionnaire that had two sections A and B. Data were analyzed with IBM SPSS version 21 using descriptive measures and frequency distributions. Non-co-educational secondary schools, co-educational secondary schools with sexuality education programs, and private secondary schools were excluded, and only co-educational public secondary schools without sexuality education programs and students 10–19 years were included in the study. Results: Prevalence of sexual intercourse was 41.5% and was statistically significantly higher among the boys than the girls. Among the sexually exposed boys, 33% of them were sexually active, while among the girls, 32.7% were sexually active.(χ2 = 0.73; P =0.34). Among the age groups, 33% of students within the ages of 14–16 years and 82.6% within the ages of 17–19 years were sexually exposed. The percentages sexually exposed for polygamous and monogamous homes were 186 (55.5%) and 106 (27.7%), respectively (χ2 = 58; P = 0.00). Similarly, students in SS3 class and students that were not monitored by parents had higher percentages of ever indulging in sexual activity, with 79.7% and 52.3%, respectively (χ2 = 17.3; P = 0.00), (χ2 = 56; P = 0.01). Forty-nine point four (49.4%) of the students whose mothers had at most primary education have had sexual exposure, while 34% of those whose mothers had at least secondary education have had sexual exposure (χ2 = 18.23; P = 0.00). Similarly, students whose parents had unskilled jobs also had a high percentage of sexual exposure (χ2 = 13.6; P = 0.00.). Age (odds ratio [OR] = 2.69) indicated that as the age increases the students were 2.69 times more likely to be sexually exposed, Family type (OR = 3.01) showed that students from polygamous homes were 3 times more likely to have been sexually exposed than their counterparts from monogamous families. Conclusion: The prevalence of risky sexual behavior among students in co-educational secondary schools in CRS, Nigeria, is high. Age, family type, parental monitoring, and socioeconomic status were strongly associated with risky sexual behavior.


How to cite this article:
Eyam LE, Eyam SE, Ekpeyong BN, Ndep AO, Akpan MI, Ekanem EE. Determinants of risky sexual behavior among secondary school adolescents in cross River State, Nigeria.Niger J Med 2021;30:658-664


How to cite this URL:
Eyam LE, Eyam SE, Ekpeyong BN, Ndep AO, Akpan MI, Ekanem EE. Determinants of risky sexual behavior among secondary school adolescents in cross River State, Nigeria. Niger J Med [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 23 ];30:658-664
Available from: http://www.njmonline.org/article.asp?issn=1115-2613;year=2021;volume=30;issue=6;spage=658;epage=664;aulast=Eyam;type=0